Yes, Contract Cheating Can Be Detected – Keynote Presentation Slides

I was invited to deliver the opening keynote for the Eighth Annual Congress of Academic Integrity held remotely for Universidad de Monterrey, Mexico on 24 September 2020. The theme I was asked to talk about was contract cheating detection, providing me with the opportunity to review the state-of-the-art in research and practice in this field.

You can see the slides I used below (and also on my SlideShare account).


Detecting contract cheating is far from a solved problem, but there are methods in development that will make it possible in several situations. The danger is that the contract cheating industry knows this too and is always ready to adapt.

As I mention in the presentation, I believe detection needs to combine human detection with technical support. But this is only one part of the wider puzzle regarding how we can best address contract cheating.

The video from the presentation is also available, which you can watch here.

Contract Cheating: Identifying, Preventing and Detecting – Webinar Slides

How do we, as university staff and instructors, identify, prevent and detect contract cheating. That was the theme I was asked to talk about for a webinar for Brunel University London, held on 23 September 2020, designed to celebrate the launch of Brunel’s new academic integrity procedures.

You can see the slides I used below (and also on my SlideShare account).



Although it is impossible to completely prevent contract cheating, I do believe there are strategies to help reduce the likelihood and impact of contract cheating and to mitigate for the risk that is poses to society. I discuss several such strategies in the slides.

We do need to continue to work to develop further strategies, along with a continued awareness of what contract cheating means for the sector.

Taking Action Against Contract Cheating – Webinar Slides

Contract cheating continues to be a real issue in education, particularly in light of the Covid-19 situation. In this session, I discussed how students, staff and everyone involved with education can take education. Much of the presentation highlighted the International Day of Action against Contract Cheating.

You can see the slides I used below (and also on my SlideShare account).


A very general range of questions were asked, which shows that we do need to continue to be providing support regarding contract cheating for people of all levels of experience.

The video from the presentation is also available, which you can watch here.

Contract Cheating in the Context of Covid-19: Five Key Ideas to Consider – Webinar Slides

Epigeum invited me to deliver a webinar looking at the particular challenges posed by contract cheating as we deal with the Covid-19 situation. I focused on five key areas, considering particularly how contract cheating services are using Covid-19 to their advantage and encouraging students to buy from them.

You can see the slides I used below (and also on my SlideShare account).


The session went well with no shortage of questions. It was illuminating to look at the type of advertising being used by the sites, with Covid-19 guarantees offered and all kinds of assurances that the firms were still operating and meeting deadlines.

Epigeum have also released the video, which you can watch here.

Assessing With Integrity – The Role of Technology – Webinar Slides

As part of my academic work with the UK’s Quality Assurance Agency I delivered a short webinar presentation looking at technology and assessment in light of Covid-19 and the move to online teaching.

The slides considered why academic integrity is still important, the threats posed to academic integrity in the current situation and the associated technological tools available to support education and quality assurance.

You can see the slides I used below (and also on my SlideShare account).


The webinar was well-received and led into an interesting panel discussion. One of the areas that attracted interest was my point that technology is a tool, not a solution. Software designed to identify similarity and detect plagiarism can be useful for helping students to improve their writing and ensuring academic integrity, but the use of such a tool does not mean that documents are all free of plagiarism. There are similar analogies to consider for software designed to ensure the integrity of online exams.

I do think the sector has done well to adapt to supporting students using teaching and assessment modalities that are new to everyone in a very short time period, but this does not mean that we should be complacent. We can use this as an opportunity to innovate and improve the standard of education for all students, whilst still preserving academic integrity.

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