Mirror This Tweet Style For Twitter Success In 2016

I’ve recently been presenting some of the methods that have improved my Twitter viewership in 2016.

In this post, I’m going to take a look at the tweets I’ve made so far in 2016 which have gained more than 2000 impressions (some substantially more). The number of impressions that each tweet has received are also shown.

I’ve also performed an analysis to compare these high-performing tweets against the 10 strategies identified to see how closely these match. The analysis is slightly rough, but the strategies and analysis are shown below (you can click on the image to view it at full size):

AnalysisOfHighPerformingTwitterTweets

Strategy #1: Use tweets with photos (or include other images)

Strategy #2: Mention influential people in tweets (so long as they will care enough to retweet)

Strategy #3: Mention companies who will want the publicity in tweets

Strategy #4: Use tweets to promote the agenda and events of the company that you work for

Strategy #5: Tweet positive comments relating to the achievements of others

Strategy #6: Engage with Twitter hashtags, or generate them when they don’t already exist

Strategy #7: Use multiple tweets on a related theme to build interest

Strategy #8: Retweet other people to help them increase their Twitter reach

Strategy #9: Attend (or organise) events and engage with them widely on Twitter

Strategy #10: Tweet interesting content on a regular basis

The classifications here are slightly subject to personal judgement. They do depend on knowing my wider tweets, something that would make this automating an analysis like this difficult. But, there are some trends that seem apparent.

All of my successful tweets have taken place in association with events, whether these are talks, marketing activities such as open days, conferences or awards. They’ve also all formed part of a series of tweets that I’ve made during those events, almost always referring to companies, individuals and hashtags.

Some of the strategies can’t be directly analysed in this way, such as retweeting. It’s also subjective to consider whether content is interesting and often this is independent to the more marketing style of tweets that generate the large number of impressions.

It was also interesting to see that not all of my successful tweets include a photo (but many do).

There are certainly lessons to learn here when tweeting to get results and I encourage you to take a close look at the Twitter marketing strategy that works best for you.

1000 Twitter Impressions Per Day In 2016 (Video Version)

I recently presented 10 strategies I use to encourage Twitter engagement.

I’ve provided more detail about these strategies in this video version, looking particularly at the tweets that have got me results in 2016 and the reasons behind this.

It’s really interesting to look back and see which strategies work – and which activities I did that are useful for other professional purposes, but not strictly for viewers.

Do take a look at the video and feed back any ideas to improve engagement in the comments section below.

1000 Twitter Impressions Per Day In 2016 – Use These Twitter Strategies To Get Your Tweets Noticed

Having an active and engaged Twitter audience is of increasing importance to academics looking to market themselves. As an academic whose work and influence spans multiple fields, ranging from promoting and marketing courses, helping students to develop contacts and gain employment, working with startup companies and promoting my research and media interests, my Twitter network covers several different types of people.

I’m now in the position where my tweets are consistently receiving an average of over 1000 impressions per day and, in many cases, substantially more impressions. I’ve analysed my successful tweets of 2016 and used these to identify the general strategies that have worked best for me.

I’m presenting the 2016 Twitter analysis in the form of a set of slides. These slides can be viewed on my SlideShare account. You can also see the slides embedded below.

 

Based on this analysis, I can recommend the following 10 strategies. They should be appropriate for academics, but also anyone looking to increase their exposure on Twitter.

Strategy #1: Use tweets with photos (or include other images)

Strategy #2: Mention influential people in tweets (so long as they will care enough to retweet)

Strategy #3: Mention companies who will want the publicity in tweets

Strategy #4: Use tweets to promote the agenda and events of the company that you work for

Strategy #5: Tweet positive comments relating to the achievements of others

Strategy #6: Engage with Twitter hashtags, or generate them when they don’t already exist

Strategy #7: Use multiple tweets on a related theme to build interest

Strategy #8: Retweet other people to help them increase their Twitter reach

Strategy #9: Attend (or organise) events and engage with them widely on Twitter

Strategy #10: Tweet interesting content on a regular basis

Marketing in a professional manner on social media should be a key part of how all academics and students operate. By looking at these strategies and identifying how they apply to you, it should be possible to easily extend your Twitter reach.

How To Quickly Grow Your Pinterest Profile

One area I’ve been working on is expanding my use of Pinterest, as it’s an excellent social site, but one that I’ve fallen very behind with.

You can view my Pinterest profile here.

Pinterest is mostly a site where you can share graphics and images that you’ve seen on other sites and liked. You can also upload your own graphics and images directly to Pinterest.

However, this definition is quite broad, as you can also pin videos, slides and other resources.

There are several ways to quickly add pins to images of interest.

First of all, if you Follow other prolific pinners, you can repin some of the pins that they’ve made.

Second, you can create boards relating to areas of your research. Then just choose some of the main sites that you know of and pin appropriate images.

Third, pin your own talks. This can easily increase their exposure. You can pin slides that you’ve uploaded to SlideShare.

Fourth, you can search websites directly on Pinterest to find appropriate graphics. Use this to start off with some of your own other professional presence sites.

Fifth, grabbing screenshots is a great way to quickly create other images which you can share.

Just be creative! Pinterest had a lot of potential and is an excellent visual community and a way to expand on your own professional online presence.

The Best Way To Take Notes At Conferences And Workshops?

When attending an academic conference or workshop, it’s always useful to take notes. There might be some good ideas shared during the workshop which don’t exist on slides circulated afterwards (often the case during discussions). And, it’s unlikely that sessions will be recorded (and that you’ll have time to watch them).

But, too often notes end up being hastily scribbled down or not referred to again.

What many events are now doing is encouraging notes to be taken and shared using social media (and tablet devices, smart phones and laptops).

For instance, a workshop I was recently involved with ended up with both Twitter and Facebook discussions (here are some examples of what was recorded on social media during the event).

In this case, the Facebook discussions took place in a Facebook group.

The Twitter discussions all used a consistent hash tag.

Both of these were set up quite independently, and so led to quite different types of discussions.

There are a lot of benefits of an approach like this to people organising (and funding) the events, particularly in the increase in visibility. In both cases, people interested, but who could not attend, joined in the discussion.

The discussion created inside the event itself is also useful, particularly where delegates pick up on similar points, engage in virtual discussion and retweet. The permanent and immediate record of the event is useful for both delegates and organisers too.

There are also criticisms to this approach. One I’ve heard is that it creates two classes of delegates – those who are involved in social media and those who are not. But, this certainly doesn’t preclude people keeping their own paper and private notes.

One way I saw this used well at a recent conference was having a blogger who was monitoring the social media channels for post ideas. That created a permanent record of what was going on to add to the (sometimes hard to find at a later date) social media discussions.

I also know of academics who use a similar approach in class, encouraging students to take and share notes using social media – something which I may well try myself over the coming year.

 

How does this approach work for you? Is electronic note taking at events useful? Just use the Comment box to share your thoughts.