Plagiarism Across Europe And Beyond 2017

The Plagiarism Across Europe and Beyond conference series is now established as one of the top conferences in the world for practitioners and researchers interested in plagiarism, contract cheating and other academic integrity developments across the higher education sector.

The 2017 conference provided my first opportunity to attend and I joined a record number of delegates in Brno, Czech Republic to participate in the conference. As well as Europe, the kudos of the conference was evident with delegates attending from around the world.

From my role as a researcher into contract cheating, it was pleasing to see that this was a major theme of the conference, with two keynotes devoted to contract cheating, many presentations on contract cheating and other sessions bringing this area into their work. There is very promising work going on around the ghostwriting field right now.

I was active at the conference myself as an author for two research papers (I presented the one on contract cheating, the one on our SEEPPAI research was delivered by other members of the team), chairing a paper session and participating as a panel member for a discussion on contract cheating. There were also many useful sessions to be had outside of the scheduled activities and it was great to talk to members of the Turnitin team.

I have lots of notes and ideas from the conference. My notepad now tends to be my Twitter account, so you can see the notes from participants at the conference, including myself, collected together here:

You can view the other stories on the Storify account for Thomas Lancaster here.

Debora Weber-Wulff also provided excellent write-ups of each day of the conference on her blog. You can read her thoughts on day one, day two and day three.

As there were parallel sessions at several points during the conference, Deborah and I weren’t always in the same session, so I found her other summaries really useful. She also talks about the presentations I was involved with, as I couldn’t live tweet about this.

A lot of photography was taken during the conference and many sessions were captured on video (including, I believe, our panel discussion), so I shall look forward to seeing those. Plans for Plagiarism Across Europe and Beyond 2018 are already taking shape and that should be another awesome event. I’d also love to see more events taking place in the UK, so feel free to contact me if this is something that you’re interested in.

The New Technologies Of Plagiarism – Exploring the Culture Of Plagiarism In Higher Education

I recently attended the New Technologies in Education event, which is held by the British Council in Belgrade, Serbia. This is a large event, comprising a set of stalls attracting thousands of visitors, along with a conference with parallel sessions based around technology and education. The event covers educational initiatives from primary school upwards.

I delivered an introductory session on student plagiarism, an area of which there is much interest across the South East Europe region, but for which policies and processes are not yet firmly in place in the same way that they are in the UK.

You can see the slides for the conference presentation on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

The talk is more basic than many I would deliver to other audiences, but the slides may be of particular interest to people who are new to this field. I was also able to discuss a few findings from the ongoing work I’m involved with as part of the South East European Project on Policies for Academic Integrity (SEEPPAI) research project.

Turnitin supported my attendance at the event and I met many interested delegates at the Turnitin booth. I particularly noticed a lot of concerned schoolteachers. Although my main interest is higher education, there is more work on plagiarism that needs to be done related to students earlier in the educational cycle.

If you would like to watch my presentation, it was broadcast live on YouTube here. Alas, I am dubbed in Serbian. If anyone does speak Serbian, I’d be interested at some point in finding out what the translators think I was saying.

Plagiarism and Contract Cheating in Higher Education

Although I’m beginning to feel that more academics understand plagiarism, contract cheating and their importance, my viewpoint is often skewed by the community I’m in and the countries in which I work. It’s also becoming clear to me that there are other countries where these problems are much less understand.

I delivered a staff development workshop covering both plagiarism and contract cheating to representatives of the University of Montenegro.

You can see the slides for the workshop on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

The audience for this workshop was particularly interested in academic research, so I’ve included a number of examples of continuing research problems and areas where there are opportunities for researchers to become involved. The problems within the plagiarism and contract cheating fields are far from solved and there continue to be excellent opportunities to apply new technologies and artificial intelligence solutions here.

Exploring The Culture Of Plagiarism Invading Higher Education

I was invited to deliver a high profile keynote presentation about student plagiarism in Azerbaijan, to an audience consisting largely of Vice Chancellors, other senior figures in higher education and Government officials.

This was quite an experience for me, as it’s also the first time I’ve had a talk I’ve given translated live into a foreign language. It was a very respectful audience and I hope that the translation captured everything that I presented.

You can see the slides for the keynote presentation on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

The event was held in conjunction with Turnitin and I used the keynote slot to question several assumptions about student plagiarism and to raise awareness of why this is an important problem and one that cannot simply be ignored.

The slides contain examples of plagiarism extending beyond the traditional written essay and I hope capture the feeling that the movement that exists towards ensuring integrity in all aspects of academic life.

Student Plagiarism – What Is It? And What Should We, As Academics, Do About It?

The workshop for which the slides are included below was particularly interesting for me, as it was the first workshop for some time that I’d delivered focusing on the issue of student plagiarism, rather than the much more specific problem of contract cheating.

You can see the slides for the plagiarism workshop on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

To me, this is an important reminder that there are many staff who need advice about how to design plagiarism opportunities out of their assessments. This seems to be particularly the case for new staff who are just entering the lecturer ranks.

Much of the good practice recommendations for setting assessments that make plagiarism difficult also hold for contract cheating. It continues to be important for staff to set fresh assignments every time to remove the temptation for students to cheat, yet some staff still do not seem to be doing this. But staff should also be aware about how easy it would be for students to outsource some types of assignments.

We will continue to need workshops on plagiarism prevention, contract cheating and all types of academic integrity.

Page 1 of 212»