About Thomas Lancaster

I am an experienced Computer Science academic, best known for research work into academic integrity, plagiarism and contract cheating. I have held leadership positions in several universities, with specialty in student recruitment and keen interest in working in partnership with students. Please browse around the blog and the links, and feel free to leave your thoughts.
Website: http://thomaslancaster.co.uk
Thomas Lancaster has written 130 articles so far, you can find them below.

Policies for Academic Integrity in Montenegro and South East Europe – Council of Europe Montenegro

Montenegro is a fascinating country, which I had the pleasure to visit as part of our SEEPPAI research. There is only one public university, but it’s spread over multiple sites. There are several private universities.

I presented some of the SEEPPAI results and participated in wider discussions about academic integrity and future opportunities in the region at an event organised by the Council of Europe.

You can see the slides used in the presentation on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

The presentation discussed the wide range of views I’d experienced from staff and students in the region, often seeming to depend on the level reached within the university system. I was very pleased to see the interest in doing something about the academic integrity challenges, particularly from the students at the event.

There is a lot of good work going on in the region. It all just needs to be communicated to a wider audience.

The State Of Academic Integrity In Europe – Council Of Europe Ukraine Conference

I’ve been lucky enough to present in some interesting places recently which have been looking to make a difference in their academic integrity processes. One of those was in Kiev, Ukraine, where I was one of the main external presenters at an event organised by the Council of Europe and attended by senior university officials.

You can see the slides used in the presentation on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

When I arrived at Kiev Airport, I was greeted by signs regarding corruption and to say no to it, so it’s clear that there are attempts to make a difference here. It is always going to be a challenge because of the wider expectations within the area about how the system will operate.

The discussion I was involved with focused on the wider issues of academic integrity, particularly thinking about this from a research perspective instead of something that just involved students. There were also a lot of discussions about the wider political challenges going on in the area. The session also included details of our SEEPPAI research work.

There’s clearly very good work going on throughout Ukraine and it’s also a pleasure to be involved with far reaching projects like this.

Contract Cheating and Commissioning Staff Development Workshop

I held a detailed staff development workshop at the University of Northampton, taking a research informed view into the problem of contract cheating and looking at what can be done about it. My colleague Robert Clarke supported the workshop although he was not able to join me in person.

You can see the slides used in the workshop on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

As always, with this type of audience, the workshop generated a huge amount of discussion. I included some new examples, including my wider ongoing work on examination cheating, a focus on the increased marketing of contract cheating services and examples given directly by essay writers and essay companies that shed a wider light into how the industry operates.

Towards the end of the workshop, I asked participants to think about how they could design assessments in light of the wider issues surrounding plagiarism and contract cheating and the need to ensure academic integrity. A summary of the main points raised is included below:

  • Include a demonstration of products that students create
    – make these demonstrations compulsory for dissertations
  • Use vivas more widely and include the option of on-the-spot vivas
    – should be mentioned in assignment brief
    – make these vivas an option for all subjects
    – ensure fairness during this process
    – should be recorded
    – considered as first step of academic misconduct process
  • Teach students all about plagiarism
    – the effects of plagiarism
    – the consequences of plagiarism
    – the role of Turnitin
  • Ensure that assignments are relevant to practice
  • Change the questions in assignment briefs each year and remove from students the temptation to plagiarise
  • Get students to generate original data to include in assignments
    – provide them with more personal ownership of their work
    – consider whether anonymous marking is still appropriate as this can discourage personal ownership
  • Make sure that there is internal support for assignments
  • Incorporate sub-components into assessments with feed-forward opportunities
  • Stop using coursework and just have exams
  • Vary the assessment types across a programme
  • Link assignments together to ensure a wider understanding
    – ask students to make changes to their submitted assessments under controlled conditions

I think it’s worth stressing that these capture the main ideas from across the audience. As with any group of academics, there wasn’t always a consistent view here. I’m sure that there were people in the audience who were keen to be controversial.

These suggestions also don’t necessarily tally with my own recommendations, but there are many good starting points here for further discussions.

Combating Contract Cheating and Commissioning Student Workshop

As part of a recent visit to the University of Northampton, I delivered a workshop to students aimed at raising awareness about contract cheating.

You can see the slides for the student presentation on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

There has been a lot of work in the contract cheating field recently aimed at getting students on board. Many students feel very strongly when they know other people are cheating. I’ve worked with the Student Unions at Coventry University and Staffordshire University to hold events. The activities at University of Northampton are part of the wider work to move the partnerships with students further forward.

I’d encourage more Student Unions and individual students to get involved with the movement against contract cheating. Feel free to contact me if I can be of any assistance with this.

The New Technologies Of Plagiarism – Exploring the Culture Of Plagiarism In Higher Education

I recently attended the New Technologies in Education event, which is held by the British Council in Belgrade, Serbia. This is a large event, comprising a set of stalls attracting thousands of visitors, along with a conference with parallel sessions based around technology and education. The event covers educational initiatives from primary school upwards.

I delivered an introductory session on student plagiarism, an area of which there is much interest across the South East Europe region, but for which policies and processes are not yet firmly in place in the same way that they are in the UK.

You can see the slides for the conference presentation on my SlideShare account. They are also embedded below.

The talk is more basic than many I would deliver to other audiences, but the slides may be of particular interest to people who are new to this field. I was also able to discuss a few findings from the ongoing work I’m involved with as part of the South East European Project on Policies for Academic Integrity (SEEPPAI) research project.

Turnitin supported my attendance at the event and I met many interested delegates at the Turnitin booth. I particularly noticed a lot of concerned schoolteachers. Although my main interest is higher education, there is more work on plagiarism that needs to be done related to students earlier in the educational cycle.

If you would like to watch my presentation, it was broadcast live on YouTube here. Alas, I am dubbed in Serbian. If anyone does speak Serbian, I’d be interested at some point in finding out what the translators think I was saying.

Page 6 of 26« First...«456789»1020...Last »